Enders Falls #2, Connecticut

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The 2nd drop on Enders Falls (August 2012)

There are at least four visible, photograph-able drops along Enders Falls. I’ve already posted about drops #1 and #4, so check those out to see them. I think the second drop might be my favorite of the drops, though. (I really have to admit it’s fun to explore this area, finding all of these different views.)

The second drop clocks in at about 15-20′, and is taller than it appears in photos. The creek plunges down, and the eroded rocks surrounding it are really truly beautiful. To add to the beauty, it was very peaceful. There were only a few other people at the falls, and there are enough drops that you can find your own place to rest for a bit. If you have the time, check out all of Enders Falls!

Directions:

  1. From Hartford, head northwest toward Granby. If you were at the Hartford Airport, you could exit and head west along CT-20.
  2. Keep going on CT-20 through Granby until you come to the intersection with CT-219. (If you’re coming from another direction, head toward CT-219.)
  3. From CT-20, turn left onto CT-219 (Barkhamsted Road).
  4. About 1.5 miles from the intersection of CT-20 and CT-219, you’ll find a sign for Enders State Forest on your left. Park here and start the hike to the falls. It’s just less than half a mile one-way.

Accessibility: 8/10 (easy/moderate)
Length of Hike: 0.8 miles round-trip (to see all four falls)
Height: 18′

Where in the World is Enders Falls #2?

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Enders Falls #4, Connecticut

The fourth drop of Enders Falls (August 2012)

I’ve mentioned this before: Connecticut has more waterfalls than one might imagine. Now, I haven’t visited a many of them, but they do exist, and they’re not just small 1 or 2 foot drops. If you’re in the area, and you have limited time, then visiting the waterfalls in Enders State Forest is your best bet.

The first waterfall that I noticed is smaller in size, and not extremely interesting. The two middle waterfalls are the most impressive of the bunch, and are very beautiful. The fourth waterfall is also enjoyable, but is more difficult to photograph. You’ll want to bring a wide-angle lens in order to catch both of the drops. You might be able to photograph the upper portion separately, though I’m not sure how safe it was. The lower drop is smaller. Both of the drops together does lead to an enjoyable view, though a portion of the upper drop becomes hidden. You might get a sense of the complexities of this waterfall.

Directions:

  1. From Hartford, head northwest toward Granby. If you were at the Hartford Airport, you could exit and head west along CT-20.
  2. Keep going on CT-20 through Granby until you come to the intersection with CT-219. (If you’re coming from another direction, head toward CT-219.)
  3. From CT-20, turn left onto CT-219 (Barkhamsted Road).
  4. About 1.5 miles from the intersection of CT-20 and CT-219, you’ll find a sign for Enders State Forest on your left. Park here and start the hike to the falls. It’s just less than half a mile one-way.

Accessibility: 8/10 (easy/moderate)
Height: 12′
Length of Hike: 0.8 miles round-trip

Where in the World is Enders Falls #4?

Enders Falls #1, Connecticut

Connecticut probably doesn’t conjure up many thoughts of waterfalls, but there are actually a surprising number in this small state. The Berkshire Mountain range passes through portions of Connecticut, leading to enough topographical changes to produce some waterfalls.

Northwest of Hartford is a set of waterfalls (on the same stream) known as Enders Falls. It’s hard to pinpoint exactly how many significant drops there are, because it depends on your definition of “significant.” I found four obvious drops during my visit, but I’ve seen five and six reported also. It may also depend on how adventurous you are, as there might be more falls further downstream. The first of these waterfalls, the furthest upstream I observed, is not the most exciting of the bunch. Don’t let that deter you from visiting this area, though, as the falls are very scenic. I do think this falls is nice, it’s just not very tall. If it were the only one there, I wouldn’t suggest going out of my way to visit it.

Directions:

  1. From Hartford, head northwest toward Granby. If you were at the Hartford Airport, you could exit and head west along CT-20.
  2. Keep going on CT-20 through Granby until you come to the intersection with CT-219. (If you’re coming from another direction, head toward CT-219.)
  3. From CT-20, turn left onto CT-219 (Barkhamsted Road).
  4. About 1.5 miles from the intersection of CT-20 and CT-219, you’ll find a sign for Enders State Forest on your left. Park here and start the hike to the falls. It’s just less than half a mile one-way.

Accessibility: 9/10 (easy)
Height: 6′
Length of Hike: 0.8 miles round-trip (for all four falls)

One of the Enders Falls (August 2012)

Where in the World is Enders Falls #1?

Campbell Falls, Massachusetts

Campbell Falls in August 2012

I’ve always been interested in geography, so Campbell Falls was very intriguing to me. I had been weaving back and forth between Massachusetts and Connecticut to visit various waterfalls, and Campbell Falls might have been one of the later stops during the day. Many of the falls up to that point had been rather disappointing, most likely because it was later in the summer, when many falls dwindle down anyway. I really wasn’t sure what to expect with Campbell Falls.

I’m in Connecticut, and then I enter Massachusetts. The road to the falls is just past the border. I drive down the road, and at one point, I think I’ve entered Connecticut again. At the parking lot, there’s a post indicating what state you’re standing in. I start the short hike to the falls, and just about halfway there, there’s another one of these posts. I really wasn’t sure which state I was in at that point in time. The falls are extremely easy to find, luckily. I had to go back to the map later to find out I was officially in Massachusetts.

The falls probably ended up being my favorite that day and throughout the whole trip. Bash Bish Falls was honestly just too crowded for me. The other falls often suffered from low flow. During the whole 0.4 mile round trip hike, I was essentially the only person at Campbell Falls. Somebody arrived just as I was leaving.  It was really cool to have the whole place to myself. And it helps that the waterfall had relatively good flow and was very scenic. In late summer, this waterfall might be your best bet for enjoying nature in relative solitude.

Directions:

  1. The falls are found in between the towns (villages) of Norfolk, CT and New Marlborough, MA. From Norfolk headed north, the road is numbered as CT-272 (North Street). The road seems to be named Norfolk Road in Massachusetts.
  2. If you’re headed north, you will cross the border from CT to MA, and then Campbell Falls Road will be directly to your left. Turn onto Campbell Falls Road.
  3. Drive a short distance to the parking area for the falls, which is found in the Connecticut version of Campbell Falls State Park (I think).
  4. From there, follow the short trail to the falls. You should pass the sign into Massachusetts, otherwise you’re probably not at the right place!

Accessibility: 8/10 (easy/moderate)
Height: 50′
Length of Hike: 0.4 miles round-trip

Where in the World is Campbell Falls?

Codfish Falls, Connecticut

This past weekend, I visited a number of waterfalls in Connecticut and Massachusetts. I hadn’t really planned any specific route or itinerary, and so I decided to start by driving to Connecticut. I had volunteered to take a later flight into Boston, so I didn’t have as much time as originally planned. I decided to see what waterfalls were in the vicinity, though. If travelling in New England, the book “New England Waterfalls” by Greg Parsons and Kate Watson is very useful.

Headed from Boston to Hartford, it ended up that Codfish Falls was along the way, and it seemed easy enough to visit (except for the fact that my GPS and the car charger port were not getting along well). And, well…it was easy to visit. The drive through the northern part of Connecticut can be really very beautiful. It seemed more isolated and quaint than I originally expected.

Once at the area for the falls, it was just a short hike along a very beautifully wooded path to the falls. It was relatively late in the evening, and the forest was shielding much of the sunlight. This made it difficult to get a really great picture. The endeavor was further complicated by logs in the stream, along with the angle I was standing at relative to the falls. When trying to use the flash, it just lit up everything in front of the falls, making the falls look really weird. Without the flash, I got better results, but most of them were pretty devoid of light. While the falls are not tall, nor was there any significant amount of water flowing, it was still a nice way to make the day worthwhile, waterfall-wise.

Directions:

  1. From the intersection of CT-190, CT-320, and US-44 (north of Storrs), head east on US-44.
  2. After just a mile or two, look for Codfish Falls Road on your right.
  3. Turn right onto Codfish Falls Rd. It’s rather narrow, so drive slowly.
  4. Drive 0.9 miles down Codfish Falls Rd. You will pass over a bridge, and DIRECTLY after crossing the bridge, there will be a dirt area on the right with room for one or two cars. Park carefully due to the narrow nature of the road.
  5. Follow the short path to the falls. It’s less than 1/10 of a mile from the road.

Accessibility: 10/10 (easy, to get to the base, it does require a teeny bit more effort)
Height: 20′ total drop
Length of Hike: 0.15 miles round-trip

Codfish Falls in August 2012

Where in the World is Codfish Falls?