Enders Falls #2, Connecticut

enders252520falls25252025252897252529

The 2nd drop on Enders Falls (August 2012)

There are at least four visible, photograph-able drops along Enders Falls. I’ve already posted about drops #1 and #4, so check those out to see them. I think the second drop might be my favorite of the drops, though. (I really have to admit it’s fun to explore this area, finding all of these different views.)

The second drop clocks in at about 15-20′, and is taller than it appears in photos. The creek plunges down, and the eroded rocks surrounding it are really truly beautiful. To add to the beauty, it was very peaceful. There were only a few other people at the falls, and there are enough drops that you can find your own place to rest for a bit. If you have the time, check out all of Enders Falls!

Directions:

  1. From Hartford, head northwest toward Granby. If you were at the Hartford Airport, you could exit and head west along CT-20.
  2. Keep going on CT-20 through Granby until you come to the intersection with CT-219. (If you’re coming from another direction, head toward CT-219.)
  3. From CT-20, turn left onto CT-219 (Barkhamsted Road).
  4. About 1.5 miles from the intersection of CT-20 and CT-219, you’ll find a sign for Enders State Forest on your left. Park here and start the hike to the falls. It’s just less than half a mile one-way.

Accessibility: 8/10 (easy/moderate)
Length of Hike: 0.8 miles round-trip (to see all four falls)
Height: 18′

Where in the World is Enders Falls #2?

Enders Falls #4, Connecticut

The fourth drop of Enders Falls (August 2012)

I’ve mentioned this before: Connecticut has more waterfalls than one might imagine. Now, I haven’t visited a many of them, but they do exist, and they’re not just small 1 or 2 foot drops. If you’re in the area, and you have limited time, then visiting the waterfalls in Enders State Forest is your best bet.

The first waterfall that I noticed is smaller in size, and not extremely interesting. The two middle waterfalls are the most impressive of the bunch, and are very beautiful. The fourth waterfall is also enjoyable, but is more difficult to photograph. You’ll want to bring a wide-angle lens in order to catch both of the drops. You might be able to photograph the upper portion separately, though I’m not sure how safe it was. The lower drop is smaller. Both of the drops together does lead to an enjoyable view, though a portion of the upper drop becomes hidden. You might get a sense of the complexities of this waterfall.

Directions:

  1. From Hartford, head northwest toward Granby. If you were at the Hartford Airport, you could exit and head west along CT-20.
  2. Keep going on CT-20 through Granby until you come to the intersection with CT-219. (If you’re coming from another direction, head toward CT-219.)
  3. From CT-20, turn left onto CT-219 (Barkhamsted Road).
  4. About 1.5 miles from the intersection of CT-20 and CT-219, you’ll find a sign for Enders State Forest on your left. Park here and start the hike to the falls. It’s just less than half a mile one-way.

Accessibility: 8/10 (easy/moderate)
Height: 12′
Length of Hike: 0.8 miles round-trip

Where in the World is Enders Falls #4?

Enders Falls #1, Connecticut

Connecticut probably doesn’t conjure up many thoughts of waterfalls, but there are actually a surprising number in this small state. The Berkshire Mountain range passes through portions of Connecticut, leading to enough topographical changes to produce some waterfalls.

Northwest of Hartford is a set of waterfalls (on the same stream) known as Enders Falls. It’s hard to pinpoint exactly how many significant drops there are, because it depends on your definition of “significant.” I found four obvious drops during my visit, but I’ve seen five and six reported also. It may also depend on how adventurous you are, as there might be more falls further downstream. The first of these waterfalls, the furthest upstream I observed, is not the most exciting of the bunch. Don’t let that deter you from visiting this area, though, as the falls are very scenic. I do think this falls is nice, it’s just not very tall. If it were the only one there, I wouldn’t suggest going out of my way to visit it.

Directions:

  1. From Hartford, head northwest toward Granby. If you were at the Hartford Airport, you could exit and head west along CT-20.
  2. Keep going on CT-20 through Granby until you come to the intersection with CT-219. (If you’re coming from another direction, head toward CT-219.)
  3. From CT-20, turn left onto CT-219 (Barkhamsted Road).
  4. About 1.5 miles from the intersection of CT-20 and CT-219, you’ll find a sign for Enders State Forest on your left. Park here and start the hike to the falls. It’s just less than half a mile one-way.

Accessibility: 9/10 (easy)
Height: 6′
Length of Hike: 0.8 miles round-trip (for all four falls)

One of the Enders Falls (August 2012)

Where in the World is Enders Falls #1?

Berthoud Pass Falls, Colorado

Berthoud Pass Falls in August 2009

As I’m driving higher and higher in elevation toward Rocky Mountain National Park, I keep thinking there should be some waterfalls somewhere! We’re talking about 10,000′ feet here, and there’s enough elevation change to expect a few along the roadside! Well, there were one or two of them, and I’ve called the easiest to visit Berthoud Pass Falls.

Berthoud Pass Falls is found as your going through the Berthoud Pass, which might be obvious. The pass is found along US-40 after exiting I-70 going toward Winter Park/Fraser, which continues on into Rocky Mountain National Park. There is a pull-off near the highest point which I think is really meant for the awesome views of the valleys far, far below. If you look ahead, you’ll notice a creek cascading down a hill, and this is where the falls (maybe should cascade) are found. In the summer months, others will also likely be exploring the area.  It is a truly beautiful sight early in the day. The wildflowers were exploding along the creek in mid-August. Even if the falls aren’t the most unique, it’s still definitely worth a stop for the overall ambiance.

Directions:

  1. If you’re driving along I-70 past Idaho Springs, this can be found along US-40.
  2. Take the exit for US-40, which starts heading north toward Winter Park and Fraser, continuing on to Granby and Rocky Mountain National Park.
  3. I’m not exactly sure how far it is to Berthoud Pass, but I believe there’s a sign, and the turnoff is relatively obvious.  You will have been heading uphill for a ways as you come along the area.

Accessibility: 10/10 (easy)
Height: 30′ (possibly more)
Length of Hike: not applicable/roadside

Where in the World is Berthoud Pass Falls?