Yellow Spring Falls, Ohio

In the town of Yellow Springs, you can find Glen Helen Nature Preserve, which has three smaller waterfalls in it: Yellow Spring Falls, The Cascades at Glen Helen, and Grotto Falls. I’m not sure if this waterfall is where the town got it’s name, but it’s a unique waterfall. I’m not sure if it’s a natural waterfall, or if it’s man-made (possible it could be accidental). Looking at the picture now, it appears to be a mix of natural and something people added on to.

At 4′ tall, Yellow Spring Falls isn’t super exciting, but the color of the rocks is fascinating. The rocks do have a yellow-orange hue to them. The trail system to find the falls can be somewhat confusing, so I’ve included a map in the directions below.

Directions:

  1. Head into the town of Yellow Springs. (There are a number of ways to enter, so I’ll let you figure that part out.)
  2. From the downtown area, head south on Corry Street.
  3. Turn left in the parking area, which is found at 405 Corry Street.
  4. At the parking area, pay the entrance fee. Follow the Inman Trail to the falls. It may help to have this map, since the trail system can be confusing.

Accessibility: 7/10 (easy/moderate)
Height: 4′
Length of Hike: ~ 1 mile round-trip

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Yellow Spring Falls in August 2015

Where in the World is Yellow Springs Falls?

The Cascades at Glen Helen, Ohio

Outside of Dayton, you can find a number of waterfalls. None of them are particularly tall or large, but they’re still interesting nonetheless. One place you can find a number of smaller waterfalls is Glen Helen Nature Preserve. The preserve is found in the town of Yellow Springs, which gets its name from one of the waterfalls in the preserve.

From the parking area off of Corry Street, the trail is relatively straightforward to find. It initially leads you downhill toward Birch Creek. Once you reach that creek (which might be the 2nd one you meet), you can either cross that river over a rock bridge, or you can take a left and head uphill. The Cascades mentioned here are found by taking the left uphill. Keep walking for a way until you reach the falls, which are difficult to miss.

That being said, the trail system is surprisingly complex and isn’t marked as well as it really should be. Finding the Cascades was easy, but after that, it was very easy to get lost. Some of the trails lead to dead ends or private property, and you don’t know until you end up at that point! I’m not sure what trail we used to get back to the parking lot.

Directions:

  1. Head into the town of Yellow Springs. (There are a number of ways to enter, so I’ll let you figure that part out.)
  2. From the downtown area, head south on Corry Street.
  3. Turn left in the parking area, which is found at 405 Corry Street.
  4. At the parking area, pay the entrance fee. Then start heading along the main trail, which will head downhill.
  5. After reaching the low point of the trail, head left uphill toward The Cascades. It may help to have this map, since the trail system can be confusing.

Accessibility: 7/10 (easy/moderate)
Height: 10′
Length of Hike: ~ 1 mile round-trip

The Cascades in mid-August 2015

Where in the World is The Cascades at Glen Helen?

The Cascades, California

The Cascades in May 2011

Yosemite National Park has so many amazing waterfalls, that not all of them are strongly advertised. You might be able to find a few of them on a map, and The Cascades might be on one of them, but I can’t find it on a map now! With Yosemite Falls, Bridalveil Falls, and many others, it’s easy to forget the other amazing waterfalls!

I think you’ve officially entered the park by the time you see The Cascades, but I don’t believe you’ve entered the main loop. And that may be why it can be easy to miss. You may not see The Cascades depending on the direction you’ve come. I had tried to enter via CA-120 (headed south), but discovered that there was still snow falling in May. So I turned around, and connected onto CA-140, which heads into the park, and is open more. From 140, it’s almost impossible to miss The Cascades, unless you’re overwhelmed by some other breathtaking view. Still, it’s pretty hard to miss.

The total waterfall is 500′ tall (approximately), though I’m not sure about the height of the portion that is most visible. I have seen other pictures of the whole falls, but to me, it actually seems less impressive in the whole. Focusing just on the last drop, it seems to be very similar to the lower portion of Yosemite Falls. In May 2011, the flow over the falls was intense, which made stopping worthwhile.  Another waterfall, Wildcat Falls, is very close by.

Directions:

  1. Head east along CA-140, entering into Yosemite National Park. You will have passed the pay station already.
  2. A little less than 2 miles from the CA-140/CA-120 junction, you’ll find the parking pull-off for the falls. I didn’t have any difficulty finding a spot. (Use the junction as a guide. If you’ve passed the junction and you’re headed further into the park, you can turn around to find the falls. You could just try and see the falls on the way out, unless you’re taking a different route.)

Accessibility: 10/10 (easy)
Height: 500′ (that can be viewed)
Length of Hike: roadside

Where in the World is The Cascades?