Crooked Creek Falls, Alaska

Crooked Creek Falls Alaska (27)

The lower portion of Crooked Creek Falls in August 2014

Crooked Creek Falls in Valdez is one of those waterfalls that isn’t advertised very well. A search doesn’t bring up any quick mention of this waterfall in Valdez, and yet it’s really tall. I should mention, this could be a different creek for all I know, but it’ definitely in Valdez.

I noticed a small cascade as I was driving by the Crooked Creek Information Center for the Chugach National Forest as I was approaching Valdez. It appeared to be 15′ tall or so, though I could tell that some of the waterfall was hidden behind the trees. Then as I was exploring Valdez when I had some time, I noticed that there was a much taller waterfall off in the distance. It was very foggy the day that I visited, so this waterfall could only be viewed when the cloud layers had cleared, but there was definitely a large waterfall, and its location would coincide with Crooked Creek. Looking at a topographic map, it seems that this whole waterfall drops about 1200′, which is quite impressive. So if you’re headed to Valdez, look for the tall waterfall that you might not expect.

Directions:

  1. There aren’t many ways to enter into Valdez. You could fly or drive or take a boat, but even then, it’s limited. If driving, you pretty much enter the city via AK-4.
  2. Along AK-4, there’s an information center for Crooked Creek in the Chugach National Forest. It’s on your right if driving into Valdez. The smaller view of the waterfall is roadside near the information center.
  3. I viewed the bigger drop from Valdez itself, looking northeast.

Accessibility: 10/10 (easy)
Height: ~1200′
Length of Hike: roadside

Crooked Creek Falls Alaska (17)

The larger view of Crooked Creek Falls (or some creek dropping precipitously)

Where in the World is Crooked Creek Falls?

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Tiffany Falls, Ontario

Tiffany Falls Ontario (77)

Tiffany Falls in late July 2019

I had the chance this past weekend to finally visit some waterfalls in Hamilton, Ontario. It is reported that there are over 100 waterfalls in the city/region. I am recovering from some surgery, so I decided to find waterfalls that seemed to be easier hikes, just in case anything happened.

I started with Tiffany Falls because I had seen some photos that indicated that the falls were flowing. In the summer months, it isn’t always a guaranteed thing that a waterfall will be flowing, even in places that have a lot of water. I was definitely in luck because there was water flowing over the four falls I visited in the area. I visited the falls on a Sunday, and parking was at a premium. Based on visits to Tews Falls and Webster Falls on weekdays, weekday parking isn’t as much of an issue.

The hike to Tiffany Falls isn’t particularly difficult, and is a quarter of a mile from the parking area. In addition to Tiffany Falls, from Tiffany Falls, you can hike about 0.6 miles one-way to Sherman Falls, which again wasn’t a wildly difficult hike, though it did involve some stairs. Canterbury Falls is further along the trail, though I didn’t visit that waterfall.

Directions:

  1. There are multiple different ways to arrive at the falls. I was headed east from London, Ontario, so we were on ON-403 E. If you’re on ON-403 E, take exit 58 which will take you to Wilson Street.
  2. Turn left on Wilson Street W and head northeast on Wilson Street W, which will turn into Wilson Street E. The address for the Tiffany Falls Conservation Area is 900 Wilson Street E.
  3. The parking area will be to your right if you are headed northeast. There is a day fee to park there, and parking may be limited on the weekends.
  4. From there, you can follow the trail to Tiffany Falls or cross the street and follow the Bruce Trail to Sherman Falls.

Accessibility: 9/10 (easy)
Height: 69′
Length of Hike: 0.5 miles round-trip

Where in the World is Tiffany Falls?

Hamilton Falls, British Columbia

Hamilton Falls British Columbia (3)

Hamilton Falls in September 2014

Yoho National Park in British Columbia has a number of impressive waterfalls: Takakkaw Falls and Wapta Falls are two great examples. But there are a number of smaller, though still beautiful waterfalls in the park.

The hike to Hamilton Falls starts at a stunningly beautiful lake, Emerald Lake, which gets its name from the beautiful color of the water. Instead of heading toward the lake, which is still an easy stop, you’ll turn toward the mountains/hills and follow the trail to Hamilton Falls. The hike is rather short, and isn’t very difficult. The amount of water flowing over the falls wasn’t large, but there was something ethereal about the way the water carved a path through the rock. It’s not as impressive as some of the other waterfalls in the park, but I found it to be a worthwhile excursion.

Directions:

  1. From Trans-Canadian Highway 1 near Field, there will be a turn onto Emerald Lake Road. If you’re headed west, it would be a right turn.
  2. Once on Emerald Lake Road, continue to the very end of the road, where you’ll encounter a parking lot and Emerald Lake. You’ll pass by Natural Bridge Falls on the way.
  3. From the parking lot, head west toward Hamilton Falls.

Accessibility: 7/10 (easy/moderate)
Height: 100′
Length of Hike: 0.9 miles round-trip

Where in the World is Hamilton Falls?

Stewart Falls, Utah

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The lower drop of Stewart Falls in May 2013

When I visited Utah in May 2013, I was initially under the impression (I believe) that you couldn’t visit the falls since it was near the Sundance Resort. But after a bit more research, I found that there were definitely ways that you could visit Stewart Falls. Along the way, I stopped at Bridal Veil Falls, which is one of the taller waterfalls you’ll find in Utah.

The Stewart Falls Trail starts at the Aspen Grove Parking area/trail head. There are a number of trails that start here, and there may be a fee to park here (though I don’t remember that very clearly). The Stewart Falls Trail is about 1.7 miles one-way from the parking area to the falls, and along the way, there is really beautiful scenery! In early May, it wasn’t particularly hot (most of the time), and there was even some flurries up at higher elevations. I don’t remember the trail being particularly difficult, mostly moderate because of the distance hiked.

Once you reach the Stewart Falls, you’ll be able to photograph the lower plunge easily, but there is another drop above that is difficult to photograph simultaneously. So the falls are actually about 200′ tall, but it won’t appear that way in most photographs. It’s still definitely a scenic waterfall!

Directions:

  1. The Aspen Grove parking area is off of UT-92, and you can arrive at it from two different directions. I started near Provo/Orem and headed east on US-189. This was because I knew I would pass Bridal Veil Falls on my way there (or back).
  2. If you’re on US-189 headed east, you’d turn left on UT-92 and head north toward Sundance.
  3. Past Sundance is the Alpine Grove Trail Head and parking area. Park here, and then follow the Stewart Falls Trail.

Accessibility: 6/10 (moderate)
Height: 200′
Length of Hike: 3.4 miles round-trip

Where in the World is Stewart Falls?

Stair Step Falls, Minnesota

Onion River Minnesota (6)

One portion of Stair Step Falls on the Onion River in August 2015

When my father, nephew, and I visited Stair Step Falls (also referred to as Onion River Falls) in August 2015, there wasn’t a whole lot of water flowing down the river. That doesn’t mean it wasn’t fun to explore. Starting at the Ray Berglund Wayside along MN-61, I remember climbing uphill toward the Onion River. Once you’ve climbed uphill toward the river, there are a lot of different options to deviate and see different drops.

When I looked at the original picture trying to determine the height of the falls, I said approximately 15′, but I remember now that there are numerous drops. I was trying to find out if anyone else has determined the height of the overall drop along the river, and I’m going to estimate it is at least 100′ from pictures that I’ve seen when there is a lot more water flowing. I do remember climbing and being able to stand on the river bed and look down a ways to the lake shore. At high flow, Stair Step Falls on the Onion River should be very impressive!

Directions:

  1. Drive along MN-61. Between Tofte (further south) and Lutsen (further north), you’ll find the Ray Berglund Wayside.
  2. It will be on the left of the road if headed north. Park here, and head uphill to find the falls. (There may be a new trail built since I’ve last been here, but I’m not sure.)

Accessibility: 6/10 (moderate)
Height: ~100′
Length of Hike: 1 mile round-trip (this may be shorter now, or unnecessary in high flow)

Onion River Minnesota (12)

Another portion of Stair Step Falls

Where in the World is Stair Step Falls?

Onomea Falls, Hawaii

Onomea Falls (5)

Onomea Falls in March 2013

I’ve mentioned this in a previous post about Boulder Creek Falls, but if you get the chance to visit the Big Island of Hawaii, do so! And then if you get the chance to visit the Hawaii Tropical Botanical Garden, you should. It’s a really beautiful place on the east side of the island, so it tends to be a bit quieter.

At the botanical gardens, you’ll find a number of beautiful plants, and even a few interesting animals. And there are two waterfalls there. Boulder Creek Falls is more difficult to see. Onomea Falls is the easier one to capture, even though it does have a few different portions. It’s just more out in the open! Onomea Creek travels through the botanical gardens and empties into the Pacific Ocean. Along the hike, you can see where the creek meets the ocean, and the waves crashing into the rocks are just beautiful!

Directions:

  1. The website for the Hawaii Tropical Botanical Garden does a very good job directing you, so the link is provided here: http://www.htbg.com/directions.html
  2. Honestly, just wander around the whole botanical garden, enjoying all of the splendor.

Accessibility: 9/10 (easy)
Height: 120′ (over multiple drops)
Length of Hike: 1 mile round-trip

Where in the World is Onomea Falls?

Aguasabon Falls, Ontario

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Aguasabon Falls in April 2012

Aguasabon Falls is another of the impressive waterfalls in Ontario near the Lake Superior shoreline. A very short distance from the Transcanadian Highway 17, you can find Aguasabon Falls dropping 110′ into a gorge, which then turns sharply and heads downstream into Lake Superior.

It’s an impressive sight, though it is a bit difficult to get a full view of the falls with the trees in view. And yet the geology around the falls is stunning. There’s something about the rock formations around Lake Superior that is amazing, and Aguasabon Falls doesn’t disappoint.

It’s very close to the Transcanadian Highway, and it’s also a very short hike to the falls. If you’d like to explore further down the gorge, you can also drive down a few other roads and explore the creek/river, where you’ll find Lower Aguasabon Falls. It’s nowhere near as tall as Aguasabon Falls, though it’s a great way to see both Lake Superior and the river.

Directions:

  1. From Transcanadian Highway 17 in Terrace Bay, turn right onto Augasabon Gorge Road (assuming that you are headed east initially).
  2. Drive to the end of Augasabon Gorge Road, and the short hike to the falls will start here.

Accessibility: 9/10 (easy)
Height: 110′
Hike: 0.3 miles round-trip

Where in the World is Aguasabon Falls?