Anna Ruby Falls, Georgia

I have a lot of thoughts about Anna Ruby Falls, and none of them are particularly eloquent. To get to the falls, you drive through a state park, leave the state park and enter a national forest, and then take the short hike to the falls. I remember you only pay for the national forest entrance. Random memory, right? I don’t remember the hike being particularly long or difficult, and I’m pretty sure it was paved the whole way. It’s really great for the whole family, which explains why it can be busy. Even so, I still had no difficulty finding parking.

As for photographing the falls, I wasn’t especially pleased. Overcast days are usually the best options for photographing well, but when you’re only there for two days, you don’t really have any other choice except to visit, point, and shoot. Adding more to the “difficulty” in photographing the falls are the trees blocking much of the view of the upper portion of the falls. No trees were harmed.

Looking at the pictures, Anna Ruby Falls is a trippy, visual feast for the eyes. It’s a double waterfall! A 150’+ drop is on Curtis Creek, while another 50′ drop to the right is on York Creek. To me, the falls look like they’re at an angle because of how my eyes try to focus. Or maybe the ground is just slanted? Like I said, random thoughts…

As with many Georgia waterfalls, there are others nearby, though it’s not usually a straight drive from one falls to the next. Each visit to the next waterfall require drives down curvy back roads. If you’re in the area, check out not one, but many falls. Otherwise, don’t go out of your way for just one.

Directions:

  1. From Helen, head north on GA-75 for just a few miles until you reach the junction with GA-356.
  2. Turn right onto GA-356.
  3. Turn left onto Anna Ruby Falls Rd. (This is not the first road to the left.)
  4. Head to the end of the road, where you’ll pass through the pay station to the parking area.

Accessibility: 9/10 (easy)
Height: 153′ and 50′
Length of Hike: 0.8 miles round-trip

Anna Ruby Falls in May 2012

A cascade below Anna Ruby Falls

Where in the World is Anna Ruby Falls?

Dukes Creek Falls, Georgia

The portion of Dukes Creek Falls that is on Davis Creek (May 2012)

As I am sitting here, I am trying to decide how to put this post together. No waterfall in recent memory could be more convoluted to explain as Dukes Creek Falls. In a recent post, Upper Dukes Creek Falls, I initially identified these falls as being partially located on Dodd Creek. Dodd Creek is nearby, but the falls are not located on Dodd Creek. (I based this information on another site, which is also not correct.) Instead Dukes Creek Falls is located on Davis Creek Falls, at least a portion of it. Another portion of the falls is actually located on Dukes Creek. It’s just confusing. I’m just going to assume that the all of the portions below refer to Dukes Creek Falls.

The portion of Dukes Creek Falls found on Davis Creek (as the two creeks are about to meet) is just plain frustrating. Much of it is hidden behind trees, and there’s really no clear way to nicely photograph the falls. This portion of the falls is rather tall, but gosh darn if you’re going to get a good shot! This might be better when the trees haven’t bloomed, but there’s still a lot of clutter in front of the falls.

The confluence of Davis and Dukes Creeks

The portion of the falls where Dukes Creek and Davis Creek meet are more interesting, since you can actually get a better view. You’re actually standing directly in front of them.  This portion of the falls isn’t particularly tall, though.

If you look upstream on what is Dukes Creek (to the right), you’ll see one other drop. I wasn’t sure whether to list this as a separate falls, but just decided to make it easier. You can see all of these falls along the same short part of the trail. This is also not very tall, though it is somewhat wider.

The total hike to the falls is about 2.2 miles round trip. It isn’t difficult, maybe moderate at most. It is consistently downhill on the way there, and therefore uphill on the way back. The trail is very well kept, and the final stretch to the falls includes stairs and a boardwalk.

Directions:

  1. From Cleveland, Georgia, head northwest along GA-11.
  2. After some distance turn right on GA-75.
  3. Again, some distance later, turn left on GA-348. (I seem to remember this turn coming rather abruptly.)
  4. Drive two miles to the parking area for Dukes Creek Falls Recreation Area. A National Forest pass will be required, which carries a daily cost.
  5. Follow the trail to Dukes Falls.
Accessibility: 4/10 (moderate/difficult)
Height: 250′
Length of Hike: 2.2 miles round-trip

The portion of the falls that is actually on Dukes Creek!

Where in the World is Dukes Creek Falls?

Upper Dukes Creek Falls, Georgia

When I visited northern Georgia in May 2012 searching for more waterfalls, I stopped at the Dukes Creek Falls Recreation Area in the Chattahoochee National Forest. The main attraction is clearly Dukes Creek Falls. Dukes Creek Falls is not found along Dukes Creek, but instead Davis Creek (confusing, isn’t it?). Dukes Creek Falls is found at the confluence of Davis Creek and Duke Creek.

As you’re hiking to Dukes Creek Falls, you will often be hiking alongside Dukes Creek. I noticed about a third of the way along the trail (maybe a little bit more) that I could hear water flowing nearby. Often, this is just some small cascade or rapid, but in this case there was a larger fall to be found. I would guess the falls were about 10′ tall or so. It is not particularly easy to get to these falls, but it is also nowhere near impossible. There is no official trail to the falls. You’re just very quickly heading down a moderately steep hill. There are trees and roots that planted themselves strategically to make your journey less difficult. In the end, you’re rewarded with a falls that pretty and isolated.

Directions:

  1. From Cleveland, Georgia, head northwest along GA-11.
  2. After some distance turn right on GA-75.
  3. Again, some distance later, turn left on GA-348. (I seem to remember this turn coming rather abruptly.)
  4. Drive two miles to the parking area for Dukes Creek Falls Recreation Area. A National Forest pass will be required, which carries a daily cost.
  5. Follow the trail to Dukes Falls.
Accessibility: 4/10 (moderate/strenuous)
Height: 10′
Length of Hike: 2.2 miles round-trip

Upper Dukes Creek Falls in May 2012

Where in the World is Upper Dukes Creek Falls?