Triple (Twin) Falls, Arkansas

Triple Falls in March 2011

This may be the first waterfall that I can think of that changes its name! If you visit after a nice rainfall, you’ll see Triple Falls, with three separate ribbons of water. If you show up and it’s drier, you might only see two ribbons, and now you can feel free to call it Twin Falls. Makes sense, doesn’t it?

Getting to the falls is relatively easy, assuming you head in the right direction. I found what seemed to be the parking area for the falls, and started heading along what seemed like a nice trail. It didn’t lead anywhere (of interest). I kept hiking, and finally gave up. I really hadn’t walked that far, but I had to wonder. And then, I had this clever thought…let’s check the directions again. And after reading the directions, I realized that I might have left and right (or north and south) confused…something of that sort. By chance, I also noticed a sign. It said Twin Falls. Except there’s no Twin Falls in view, even though I hear something. I decide to go to the “other side”, hike a bit, and without much effort, I was viewing Triple Falls!

I’m pretty surprised I saw the Triple version. Many of the other falls in the area seemed rather sparse for March. Hemmed-In-Hollow Falls was almost water-less, as was Liles Falls. I was disappointed with some of the falls, but Triple Falls and Eden Falls ranked as my two Arkansas favorites (of the seven I viewed).

Directions:
1) From Jasper, head west along AR-74.
2) After driving for a few miles, turn right onto Camp Orr (or Kyle’s Landing) Road. There will be signs for Kyle’s Landing and the Boy Scouts of America Camp Orr indicating the turn.
3) It’s a downhill drive along a gravel road. I don’t remember it being terrible. After a mile, you’ll take a sharp right to continue on Camp Orr Road.
4) Drive down to the bottom of the hill, and look for a sign for Twin Falls just before you enter the Boy Scout Camp. It’s somewhere very near the entrance to your LEFT as you come downhill. I don’t remember the trail being extremely noticeable at first, but once you find the sign, it’s pretty straightforward.
5) Hike the short distance to Triple (Twin) Falls.

Accessibility: 10/10

Where in the World is Triple Falls?: map

Twin Falls, Tennessee

Most waterfall enthusiasts usually throw out the “man-made” waterfalls pretty quickly. There might be a mention of a man-made falls in the back of a book, but there often not included. Twin Falls bucks the trend. I’m not even sure if “man-made” is the right term, which seems to suggest that we human beings set out to create Twin Falls.

Instead, Twin Falls was the product of we human beings harnessing the power of water to do work. A dam was built in the area, and as a product, the pressure of the water built up, and the water started flowing out of the side of the hill. And now you have Twin Falls. It’s a truly interesting falls. You can tell something is odd, considering the water emerges from the upper-middle layers of the cliff, instead of at the top of the cliff. The falls then drop into the river below, which seemed pretty turbulent when I visited over Christmas 2009. The falls are surprisingly expansive, overshadowing what may have at one time been the more impressive Great Falls. The photo below doesn’t even capture the whole of Twin Falls.

Directions:

  1. There seem to be a number of different ways to view this specific waterfall in Rock Island State Park. As a good place to start, use TN-136 as a reference. This is also known as Rock Island Road.
  2. If you are headed north, you would normally turn on TN-287 (aka Great Falls Road) to visit Rock Island State Park….Keep heading just a further bit north across the river.
  3. Just after crossing the bridge, there will be a less conspicuous road to your left, Power House Road.
  4. Turn left on Power House Road, and keep driving on it until it ends at the Twin Falls Overlook.

*Note: Little Falls is found along a trail starting at the Twin Falls Overlook.

Accessibility: 10/10
Height: 75′
Length of Hike: negligible

Twin Falls in December 2009

Where in the World is Twin Falls?

Little Falls, Tennessee

Little Falls (Christmas day 2009)

Rock Island State Park, found in central Tennessee, is a truly odd place to visit. With the forces of nature being harnessed by humans, Great Falls is greatly reduced, whereas Twin Falls shows up where it was not before. And hiding inconspicuously along a trail is Little Falls, also known as Blue Ice Falls. It is a smaller falls in comparison to the other falls in the park, though it’s not measly in height.

I visited the park on Christmas day in 2009. The park was almost completely dead, especially the northern portion of the park. The only creature I can remember coming across was a cow in my path while driving to the parking area. The parking area starts at the Twin Falls Overlook, which can’t be missed. To your right is the Downstream Trail. Not long after starting down this trail, you’ll come across Little Falls. It’s pretty difficult to miss. There was a sign at the falls, so if you’re in doubt, just look for the sign! I hiked a little bit further, but didn’t find anything of interest. I can’t remember if this was where I thought I saw another waterfall on the other side of the river in the distance, but I couldn’t really get a better view (or I had to start driving back to the airport).

Directions:

  1. There seem to be a number of different ways to view this specific waterfall in Rock Island State Park. As a good place to start, use TN-136 as a reference. This is also known as Rock Island Road.
  2. If you are headed north, you would normally turn on TN-287 (aka Great Falls Road) to visit Rock Island State Park….Keep heading just a further bit north across the river.
  3. Just after crossing the bridge, there will be a less conspicuous road to your left, Power House Road.
  4. Turn left on Power House Road, and keep driving on it until it ends at the Twin Falls Overlook.
  5. At the viewpoint, follow the Downstream Trail to your right for a view of Little Falls.

Accessibility: 9/10 (easy)
Height: 50′
Length of Hike: 0.6 miles round-trip

Where in the World is Little Falls?

Drake Falls, Oregon

When deciding what waterfall to discuss next, I choose waterfalls randomly in order to get a good variety of different locations. The first waterfall I talked about in Silver Falls State Park was Twin Falls, which is one of my least favorite falls in the park. Drake Falls, the waterfall of interest here, is another of my least favorite falls in the park. The more exciting falls in the park are to come!

Drake Falls is wide. It’s not very tall, but oh well. You can’t get a really great view of the falls, and even then, it’s not that distinct. Looking at pictures of Twin Falls and Drake Falls, I realized that it’s actually difficult to even tell the two falls apart. The other falls in the park are just more unique and interesting.

Directions:

  1. From Salem, drive east on US-22 to the junction of US-22 and OR-214.
  2. Head north on OR-214 for 15 miles, following the numerous signs to Silver Falls State Park.
  3. You can park at either the South Falls or North Falls parking areas. The South Falls parking area is larger, and the Waterfall Trail leads you past all of the falls.

Accessibility: 6/10 (moderate)
Height: 27′
Length of Hike: 8.7 miles round-trip (to see all waterfalls in the park)

Drake Falls in Silver Falls State Park (May 2010)

Where in the World is Drake Falls?

Twin Falls, Oregon

I get to start my discussion of Silver Falls State Park with one of my least favorite falls in the park. Silver Falls State Park is definitely a place every waterfall enthusiast must visit. There are ten or eleven NAMED falls, and anywhere from 5-10 UNNAMED falls, depending on how you define a waterfall.

Twin Falls, which I’m not even sure where the name came from, considering I didn’t see two falls, is one of the least spectacular falls in the park. It has nothing to do with height or width or anything of that sort. There are smaller and thinner waterfalls that have more character than this drop. It’s pretty, but there really isn’t a great view to be had. Oh well…visit for the other falls and add this one to the list.

The waterfalls can all be accessed relatively easily by the Ten Waterfalls trail. Twin Falls is about halfway along the trail, and so it doesn’t really matter whether you park at the North Falls or South Falls parking lot. Be aware that the roundtrip on the trail is about 8 miles, but it surprisingly manageable.

Directions:

  1. From Salem, drive east on US-22 to the junction of US-22 and OR-214.
  2. Head north on OR-214 for 15 miles, following the numerous signs to Silver Falls State Park.
  3. You can park at either the South Falls or North Falls parking areas. The South Falls parking area is larger, and the Waterfall Trail leads you past all of the falls.

Accessibility: 6/10 (moderate)
Height: 31′
Length of Hike: 8.7 miles round-trip (to see all waterfalls in the park)

Twin Falls in Silver Falls State Park (May 2010)

Where in the World is Twin Falls?

Twin Falls, Pennsylvania

Before I say anything else, I want to make sure that people do not trespass on the property Twin Falls is found on. Twin Falls is a waterfall that is in the Delaware Water Gap area very close to East Stroudsburg. The waterfall is on private property, though. This picture was taken from the road, so it is not of the greatest quality. It still gives you a feeling for the falls.

The waterfall is very easy to find though, and it’s not that hard to stop on the side of the road and at least view it for a short period of time (as long as you’re not blocking other cars). It should be some comfort that there are a multitude of far more interesting falls in the area that can be legally visited. Still, I would stop by just for a second to enjoy what nature has to offer.

Directions:

  1. From I-80, take the exit right near the Pennsylvania/New Jersey border that connects onto US-209.
  2. Head north on US-209 for what I remember being about 3 miles or so.
  3. On your left, there will be a Twin Falls Road. (A roundabout seems to be present now, and you may need to exit on Seven Bridge Road first.)
  4. Turn left onto Twin Falls Road. The waterfall will be to the right of you as you’re crossing the first bridge you see.

Accessibility: 10/10 (from the car)
Height: 15′
Length of Hike: roadside

Twin Falls in May 2009

Where in the World is Twin Falls?

Twin Falls, New York

Twin Falls in May 2009

The hike to Twin Falls (also referred to as Templar Falls) is short, but it’s a steep one. It’s not really that hard, but you’re going to have to essentially maneuver your way down the hill that leads to the river Twin Falls is found on. There is an easier way to view the top half of the falls, but that isn’t very exciting, especially since it’s advertised as having two parts!

It doesn’t take that long to get to the falls. Just keep track of where you came down, because you’re going to have to go back up! I think I came down the clearest route I could find, and then had to jump over rocks to get upstream to see the better view of the falls. It’s a fun experience for a smaller waterfall. This waterfall is relatively near other waterfalls, but is still secluded enough that you won’t encounter many others at this falls.

Directions:

  1. Head north on NY-14 from Watkins Glen.
  2. Turn left onto Bath Street, which will turn into County Line Road.
  3. After about 2.5 miles, turn left onto Van Zandt Hollow Road. This will merge into Templar Road.
  4. Shortly after merging onto Templar Road, you should notice a sign indicating the Finger Lakes Trail on your right. Park right here, as the falls are right on the river near you.
  5. Explore a little bit. You may find the first falls, and then you can figure out how to get down to see the whole falls.

Accessibility: 4/10 (moderate/strenuous)
Height: 25′
Length of Hike: 0.2 miles round-trip

Where in the World is Twin Falls?

Twin Falls, South Carolina

When I took my trip to see waterfalls in South Carolina, North Carolina, and Georgia, Twin Falls ended up being one of my favorite waterfalls, and it was one of the last falls that I visited. I wasn’t even sure I was going to visit it, as there are many other waterfalls in the area, but I was extremely glad that I did. Twin Falls is a visually spectacular waterfall.

Twin Falls (aka Reedy Cove Falls or Eastatoe Falls) is has two waterfalls that are separated by a distance of 15 or more feet. This is not two subsequent drops, but instead a river that has separated somewhere beyond what we can see. It just makes for a great view! Another benefit to Twin Falls is that it is not that busy, mostly because it involves a rather complicated drive to a place that I was surprised to find people inhabiting in the first place! Still, any waterfall lover should definitely check out Twin Falls.

Directions:

  1. From Pickens, SC, head north on US-178 for 12 miles.
  2. About 3 miles after the intersection of US-178 and SC-11, you’ll turn left on Cleo Chapman Road (aka Pickens County Rd. S-100). It is very easy to miss this road, so pay very close attention! If you miss this turn, it is a while before you can turn around, and that can be complex because of all the curving and winding road.
  3. Carefully drive for 2 miles to Eastatoe Community Rd. Turn right.
  4. Drive for 1 mile on Eastatoe Community Rd. and then turn right onto Waterfalls Drive, which is a one-lane road.
  5. Veer left at the first fork in the road to the end of the road, which is indicated by a sign for a nature preserve.
  6. From here, follow the trail to the falls.

Accessibility: 9/10 (easy)
Height: 75′
Length of Hike: 0.5 mi RT

Twin Falls (30)

Twin Falls in March 2009

Where in the World is Twin Falls?